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LIFE Cover 1896

LIFE magazine 1896
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Info from on inside coming soon.

Judge 1896 - A LEAP YEAR EPISODE
Woman's Weekly March 29, 1924 10c a Copy
In This Issue The Origin of Leap Year
CIRCULATION OVER 300,000 WEEKLY
Dennisons Party Magazine January / February 1928

1928 PARTY MAGAZINE
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LIFE March 12, 1956
"A LEAP YEAR GUIDE: WHERE TO FIND MEN"
 
MAD Magazine March 1960 MAD Magazine March 1960
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Instead of Feathers  

One night last week the 1940 crop of 196 top-ranking British debutantes, all of whom would have liked to have stuck Prince of Wales feathers in their hair and gone to Buckingham Palace, stuck flowers in their hair instead and went to swank Grosvenor House. For this war year there will be no court presentations of debutantes, and—at a loss to London caterers, florists, et al. of $3,000,000—no individual debut balls. It was all done at one whack at the Grosvenor, and it was the biggest social event in London since break of war.

Instead of golden thrones on a dais, there was a Leap Year Birthday Cake four feet six in diameter, with 196 candles. Instead of the Royal Family, patrons (and arbiters) were the Duchess of Grafton, the Marchioness of Reading, Lady Lawrence, Mrs. Winston Churchill and Lady Duncan. Instead of being on the Crown, as at Buckingham Palace, the party cost each of the 1,100 guests a matter of 32 shillings sixpence ($6.37). And to emphasize that Britain is grimly at war, men not in uniform committed what in peacetime London would have been the most unpardonable faux pas—instead of coming in white ties, they came in black.

Sixty post-debs of '39 and earlier vintages came in brightly colored ball dresses, but the '40 debs wore demure Court gowns of white. Two ventured crinolines, Lady Cecilia Fitzroy, cousin of the Duke of Grafton, Miss Mary Philippa Gary, niece of Viscount Falkland. Since Britain is bent on making this a democratic war, privates in uniform did not have to stay off the dance floor, as in 1914-8, twirled about the Great Room of the Grosvenor on a social par with their officers. With healthy appetites, debs and escorts gobbled large slices of the vast cake when it was finally and solemnly cut by the five hostesses, but of whoopee there was almost none and only moderate quaffing of champagne.

Big moment of the evening was when Debutante Mary Churchill, a glamor girl in anybody's country, espied her famed father, the First Sea Lord, trying to sneak in like a tired bulldog to an inconspicuous table. She promptly dragged him out to sit with her own café society group, including the orchidaceous Marquesa de Casa Maury and brilliant carrot-haired Editor Brendan Bracken of The Banker. Spotting "Winston," the whole party livened up, everyone sang For He's a Jolly Good Fellow, and at midnight the Duchess of Grafton permitted something about as daring as has ever been seen at a top-drawer Mayfair ball.

Each of the young men, fine apple-cheeked lads mostly and quick to blush, was given a Leap-Year favor which he had to decide on the spot to wear either red side out or green side out. On the red side was lettered, "Stop. Do not propose." On the green, "Go ahead, you may propose." After no end of gay squealing and innocent chaff to the discreet rhythms of Jack Harris, the party wound up at 3:30 a.m.—and many a drowsy deb was up and in uniform at 7 a.m. to get on with her war work.

 
Suffolk Times
1928 opened with a Community Club Pinochle Party in early January
at Mrs. Benjamin Sherman’s home, which was well attended. The Club
announced a number of fund-raising events in the upcoming months,
and the community was asked to mark them on their calendars:
On January 24, a Waffle Party at Mrs. Moses Griffing’s;
on January 31, an afternoon “42” Party at Mrs. Stanley Thompson’s;
on February 13, a Valentine Card Party at the Wayside Inn (now the
Historical Society building known as Heartease);
on February 29, a Leap Year Dance Party at the Forest Inn;
 
 

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THE ILLUSTRATED LONDON NEWS
 

 
                       
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